Black History, Lincoln, and Passed Over Truth

Well, this month black history is supposed to be celebrated and memorialized. So is Abraham Lincoln’s birthday. Ironic that the two come together in the same month. I notice that during black history month the activities of Martin Luther King are recalled and celebrated, but little is ever said about the accomplishments of people like Booker T. Washington or George Washington Carver. This is in error, unless the real agenda for this month is to promote the civil rights movement instead of showcasing the accomplishments of blacks that really accomplished something worthwhile as Washington and Carver did.

And then there is Lincoln’s birthday. Mr. Lincoln has been promoted as the one who freed the slaves (which he didn’t) and anyone who has read the normal “history” books in the last hundred years will be led to champion him as the “great emancipator” (which he wasn’t). He is portrayed as a great friend to black people (which he wasn’t). He is portrayed is one who believed in and promoted the equality of the blacks to whites (which he didn’t). To find out where Lincoln stood on that issue you need to check out the Lincoln Douglas Debates–the first complete unexpurgated text–published by Harper Perennial in 1993. Particularly you want to check out pages 61, 63, 189, 283, and 284.

Even after you have done that you will run across people who will blithely inform you that, when he died, Lincoln’s view of blacks had “matured” and that he didn’t feel that way anymore. Horse feathers! Lincoln’s view of blacks changed little and, again, contrary to what some will tell you he had not given up on the idea of deporting the freed slaves to some other country or countries that would have them. Interestingly enough, one of the promoters of the Emancipation Proclamation was Robert Dale Owen, well-known socialist and free thinker. Donnie Kennedy and I noted this in Lincoln’s Marxists on page 41. We stated: “…Owen’s personal letter to Lincoln was very influential in Lincoln’s issuing of the Emancipation Proclamation.” You might wonder why a socialist was interested in pursuing emancipation and let me tell you, it wasn’t for the benefit of the black folks.

Donnie Kennedy, in his book Myths of American Slavery observed that: “Not only did Lincoln hold to the belief of Negro inferiority, he was also a proponent of removing the African-American population from America once they were freed…Lincoln as the archenemy of slavery, promoter of equality, and friend of oppressed African-Americans is one of the most pervasive myths in modern America.” Of course, since the winners get to write the “history” books, inconvenient facts that get in the way of the agenda need to be shoved down the “memory hole” where, hopefully, no one will bother trying to pull them out. Another book you might want to check out along these lines is How the North Promoted, Prolonged and Profited From Slavery. It was written by three reporters from a newspaper in Connecticut, who, when digging into this subject in their own area, found a lot of information they hadn’t expected to find….

By Al Benson – Revised History –