Here’s what people really search for most on Google

You’ve seen Google’s annual lists of trendy search terms, featuring things like “robin williams,” “world cup,” and “ebola,” but those show only the most unusually popular terms, not the most popular terms overall. In fact, the most popular searches are a lot more basic.

The clear winner around the world is “Facebook,” which is funny given that you could just as easily type facebook.com into a URL bar. “Google” and “Youtube” are also popular and likewise amusing.

Below you’ll find a list of the most popular terms in the U.S. in 2014 from Google Trends. Notably, “porn” came in fifth, higher than “weather.”

Here’s what people really search for on Google:

By Gus Lubin & Mike Nudelman – Business Insider –

She was a Porn Addict – until Something Happened

Popular British vlogger Oghosa Ovienrioba revealed to the world in a video posted to YouTube last year that she is a recovering porn addict — and now she’s hoping to help others embroiled in their own personal struggles against smut.

Ovienrioba, 22, said in the clip posted in February 2014 that she was abused at an early age and began watching porn regularly at age 15 or 16, which led to years of obsessively and secretly viewing smut, according to the Daily Mail.

In addition to discussing the abuse she faced during her younger years in a viral video last year, Ovienrioba, a Christian, said that she was extremely hesitant to share her experience with porn, but that she had two dreams that she felt were signs she was supposed to share what happened.

“God, I do not want to talk about this topic … I’m not doing it,” she recalled thinking after feeling compelled to share her story.

But she changed her mind after purportedly having a second dream imploring her to describe what happened.

“When I was about 15 or 16, I started watching porn much more regularly and this time it didn’t shock me as much,” Ovienrioba said. “The thing about porn is, it works on desensitizing.”

She said that, by the time she reached 21, she was watching porn every day, if not multiple times per day.

“When you see people, you don’t even see people anymore,” Ovienrioba said. “You see them as sex objects.”

….“Lots of people don’t think girls can suffer a porn addiction but it’s a problem for both sexes,” she said, according to the Daily Mail. “I hope I can help others out there — talking about your problem is the first step.”

She said that Christians should be careful about what they let into their hearts and minds, noting that she’s cautious about what she consumes.

By Billy Hallowell – The Blaze –

Your Brain On Porn: Rotting Your Mind On The Internet

3/6/2015 – For millions of men, the first time they watched porn was – is – part of the process of growing up. Part of the journey to sexual maturation, when you start finding out what turns you on…. all fairly innocent.

But nowadays the business of porn is far more serious – and dangerous. The extension of the internet into all aspects of our daily lives allows people to find porn whenever and wherever they like, and nothing, not even the most extreme or depraved material, is more than a few clicks away….

Yet there is now a burgeoning movement to rid humanity of this scourge. Sites such as NO PORN and the charmingly named NOFAP are encouraging people to kick the habit….

But is porn really that bad? Is this a genuine problem, or simply a corrective response to the tsunami of T&A which has engulfed the internet?

To find out, IBTimes UK spoke to Gary Wilson, the high priest of the anti-porn movement, a man whose scientific background has earned him a huge internet following. His site, Your Brain On Porn, is one of the most popular resources for those seeking to learn more about the dangers posed by modern erotica, and has persuaded an army of addicts to go cold turkey.

Studies have shown that one in 25 adults is affected by compulsive sexual behavior….

Internet porn statistics –

It has been estimated that up to 37% of the entire internet is devoted to porn – although the figures vary.

Over $3,000 is spent on pornography every second.

A new pornographic video is created in the United States every 39 minutes.

Annual porn industry revenue in China is almost $28 billion.

But why are sites like YBOP gaining so much traction now? Surely porn has been around since man learnt to draw – why is it such a menace to society all of a sudden?

“First of all it’s about videos, streaming videos,” Wilson says. “That means that pre-adolescents can watch three-minute clips of real people, of real sex, if you want to call it that.

“Streaming videos started in 2006. It needed high-speed internet. Porn also created tube sites, short clips on the internet depicting scenes of hardcore sex. Thanks to the internet, everyone now has access to streaming videos.”

‘It’s rewiring our brains’

According to Wilson, porn is so addictive because the core functions of the internet tap directly into our primitive brain. It’s all to do with dopamine, the neurotransmitter that regulates the brain’s reward and pleasure centers.

“The reward circuit gets activated for things such as sex, food, water, achievement, but it also gets activated for novelty,” Wilson tells me. “And that’s what the internet is – the ability to click from scene to scene. You get a big jump in dopamine and an activation of the reward circuit. The internet is so appealing, smartphones are so appealing, because they activate the reward circuit through novelty….

internet porn] is really training all of us that we are dissatisfied,” he says. “We can easily click on something new, then we can click on Tinder and start a new date.”

Wilson is reluctant to state categorically that porn leads to violence against women, because “the studies are conflicting”. However, he suggests hardcore erotica is encouraging men, particularly young men, to view their female partners as submissive toys who will enjoy extreme versions of intercourse.

….Yet perhaps the most prevalent problem is the mental damage wreaked by today’s high-speed, ultra-stimulating internet pornography, which can all-too-easily become an insidious crutch, like alcohol or class A drugs….

The expert believes the only option is to focus on the schools, before children become hooked, and stop tip-toeing around the issue of erotica.

“What’s missing in sex education?” Wilson asks. “The education about the reward circuit. About how the internet and the delivery system can impact on the porn circuit. How the adolescent brain is completely different from the adult brain, and how that’s completely different due to the internet.”

Wilson’s masterplan may work to an extent. Perhaps subsequent generations, raised in cyberspace from birth, will be more judicious. Perhaps the No Porn movement will go global, and sites such as PornHub will go out of business. But with researchers suggesting up to 40% of the internet is now devoted to pornographic material, the crusaders have a fierce fight on their hands.

By Gareth Platt – International Business Times –

She was a top Las Vegas prostitute…then she met Jesus

Ten years ago, Annie Lobert founded “Hookers for Jesus,” an organization dedicated to helping women leave the abusive, demeaning prostitution industry.

In that time, she has been praised by press across the spectrum for her work, and even more for having the strength to leave the industry — despite financial, physical, and psychological threats and beatings.

Now, in her new book “Fallen,” Lobert talks in great detail about the childhood abuse and neglect that led her to become a prostitute — first by choice, then by force. Leaving little out, she explains how she became one of the most profitable prostitutes in Las Vegas over her 16 years in the industry, only to find herself bereft of money, friends, and family when things got hard.

After years of assaults by an ex-boyfriend and former pimp, Lobert went on to another abusive relationship, and watched her sister die of a genetic disorder. After nearly dying from cancer herself, Lobert became addicted to cocaine to help deal with the stress of helping her boyfriend launch a corporation. Even going back to prostitution couldn’t help that failing business.

Out of options, Lobert turned to Christ for the first time in more than a decade. Over several years, He opened her eyes to love, and care, and compassion – and eventually, to a new life that included a husband who encouraged her to marry as a virgin in Christ.

In a recent interview, Lobert discussed this and more with LifeSiteNews:

LifeSiteNews: What is Hookers for Jesus, and how does your ministry help sex-trafficked women?

Annie Lobert: Hookers For Jesus is an outreach on the Las Vegas strip to sex trafficking victims and sex industry ladies that I started in 2005. The main point of the outreach was to let ladies know that they are loved by God and if they needed any resources to help them in their lives, we were available to connect.

In 2007, we established our non-profit and later developed Destiny House, a home for women to heal emotionally, mentally, and spiritually from their pasts but to also help them establish their new lives outside of the sex industry….

From Life Site News –

Neuroscience proves Porn makes men’s brains childish

Two hundred years ago in the U.K., if you said you were going to a “gentleman’s club,” it was understood you were going to a private upper-class establishment where you could relax, read, play parlor games, get a meal, and gossip with others of your class. Today, in the U.S., if you said you were going to a “gentleman’s club,” it is assumed you will be paying to see a striptease in a low-lit bar.

Is this really what should typify a “gentleman”?

Pornography is often classified, along with other sexually oriented businesses, as “adult” entertainment—something for “mature” audiences. If this meant that these kinds of entertainment are “not suitable for children” then few would protest.

The very thing in the brain that is the mark of adulthood and maturity is the thing that is eroded as we view more porn. It is as if the brain is reverting, becoming more childlike. “Adult” entertainment is actually making us more juvenile.

That said, it would be foolish to use this as an argument that pornography is suitable for adults. Heroin and methamphetamines are also “not suitable for children,” but this does not mean, ipso facto, that they are healthy for those over the age of 18.

Porn advocates are fond of saying (“fond” is an understatement—they repeat it like a mantra) that pornography is sophisticated, mature entertainment suitable for responsible adults. Porn, they will have you believe, is what true gentlemen appreciate—like blue cheese, good scotch, and Dostoyevsky. As the infamous Ron Jeremy is quick to say: “Pornography is consensual sex between consenting adults, to be watched by consenting adults.”

Which leads us to ask: What exactly constitutes “adult” or “mature” behavior? Is it merely a commentary on the age of the participant? Or is it about something more? Stipulating proper definitions is complicated because today these terms are so often used as synonyms for erotic media—which is the very topic we’re trying to dissect….

Ask any neuroscientist what a “mature” human brain looks like, and he or she will likely talk to you about a region of the brain known as the prefrontal cortex. It is located directly behind the forehead and serves as the managerial center of the brain. It is responsible for our willpower, regulating our behavior, and making decisions based on wisdom and principles. When emotions, impulses, and urges surge from the midbrain, the lobes in the prefrontal cortex are there to exercise “executive control” over them. By the age of 25, this region of the brain reaches maturity, meaning that our thinking becomes more sophisticated and we can regulate our emotions more easily.

Why bring neuroscience into the equation? Because fascinating research is being done looking at the impact of viewing porn on this region of the brain.

The brain is designed in such a way to respond to sexual stimulation. Surges of dopamine are released during a sexual encounter—and yes, also pornographic encounters—giving the person a sharp sense of focus and an awareness of sexual craving. Dopamine helps to lay down memories in the brain, so the next time a man or woman is in the mood,the brain remembers where to return to experience the same pleasure: whether that be a loving spouse or the laptop in the den.

However, scientists are now seeing that continued exposure to porn gives the brain an unnatural high—something it literally isn’t wired to handle—and the brain eventually fatigues. Anatomy and physiology instructor Gary Wilson notes this is the same pattern noticed when drugs are abused: the brain becomes desensitized. More of the drug or harder drugs are needed to get the same high, and the downward spiral begins. Wilson says this brings about significant changes in the brain—both for drug abusers and porn users.

One of those changes is the erosion of the prefrontal cortex—that all-important center of executive control. When this region of the brain is weakened, when the craving for porn hits, there is very little willpower present to regulate the desire. Neuroscientists call this problem hypofrontality, where the person slowly loses impulse control….

By Matt Fradd – Life Site News –

Internet Porn Driving Human Trafficking, Profits

Pimps have realized that they can remain anonymous, make lots more money and offer more extreme and deviant sexual behaviors if they just move their “business” from the street corner to the Internet.

Popular companies like Backpage, Craigslist, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are making millions of dollars by allowing users to buy and sell women and children and to trade pornographic pictures on their sites. There is mounting public outcry demanding that these companies accept social and civic responsibility to change their ways and help curb sexual exploitation.

However, these companies are hiding behind a law that has been completely misinterpreted by our high courts – the Communications Decency Act. Congress intended that this law help protect children from exposure to Internet pornography. The act included a defense, Section 230, for Internet providers, protecting them from liability for material posted to their sites by 3rd parties. Thus, if illegal pornography or other material is posted to a site by someone not associated with the site operator, the site was to be held blameless.

Section 230 was well intentioned, but when the substantive portions of the CDA were held unconstitutional, the 230 defense was left standing and has been used by companies like Backpage, which holds its site out as a place to advertise illegal conduct such as sex trafficking of women and children. Congress never intended this result, yet some courts have ruled that the 230 defense provides, in effect, blanket website immunity for all material posted by 3rd parties on the sites. It is estimated that Backpage alone makes approximately $3 million per month on ads for prostituted and trafficked women and children.

Morality In The Media is asking for your help in asking Congress to amend this law to represent what they originally intended it to do – help protect children!

By Patrick A. Trueman – Morality In Media –