McCain Trying To Give Tonto Nat’l Forest To Rio Tinto

I think at a certain point one has to understand that globalization amounts to treason. These greedy Vichy politicians we have in Washington need to be removed before they hand over everything in the country that isn’t nailed to the floor.

This is Tonto National Forest. It is yours. It is this country’s fifth largest forest and has on average 5.8 million visitors annually. It was set aside as a national forest back in 1905 in order to protect its watersheds around key reservoirs used by the people of the communities around it which include Phoenix, Flagstaff, Prescott, Snowflake, Winslow and the Fort Apache Reservation. “The forest produces an average of 350,000 acre-feet of water each year” feeding into Theodore Roosevelt Lake and the Salt River which bisects the national forest running east to west. In 1955 Eisenhower used Public Land Order 1229 to protect parts of Tonto National Forest from the mining industry that wanted to despoil it for profits. There’s copper in them there hills and therefore, there’s gold. Thanks to that and the work of conservationists over the decades, without a doubt, it is one of the most beautiful unspoiled areas this nation has left… and Sen. John McCain wants to give it to a British mining company by using the latest version of the NDAA to do it.

Located in Tonto National Forest is a unique spot known as Apache Leap. This is the location of one of the most heroic and beautifully inspiring stories of our shared heritage in this burb we call ‘Merica… and yet far too few even know it exists. I’ll let Survival Solidarity explain.

“In the midst of an 1870 battle, US Calvary forced Apache warriors to the edge of a cliff. With the taste of defeat in their mouths standing eye-to-eye with their possible captors’, more than 80 Apache warriors escaped, leaping off the cliff and through the air to their deaths. These days at the base of that mountain chunks of obsidian can be found. They are known as the tears of the Apaches. Apache Leap, that battlefield of the past is once again the stage for a war against accelerated colonization.” Survival Solidarity

The Apache warriors chose death rather than to submit to their occupiers and watch from some reservation as their land and culture slowly died around them. There’s a lesson to be learned there.

This is the Tonto National Forest and it and the heritage behind it, belongs to you. But maybe, not for much longer.

Sen. John McCain is trying his best to hand over the mining rights, for free mind you, to a British and Australian company called Rio Tinto and their subsidiary called Resolution Copper.

But Rio Tinto and Resolution Copper have spent millions lobbying Congress and donating to lawmakers, according to data from federal election records and the Center for Responsive Politics. And according to opponents of the deal, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and backers in the House are trying to attach the deal to must-pass legislation — most likely the National Defense Authorization Act, which comes from the Armed Services Committee that McCain will chair starting in January. Huffington Post

Over at the Huffington Post, you will find that they seem to have a problem with the fact that Iran and China both have subsidiary interests in Rio Tinto and seems to be the big hangup they have with the traitorous action of Sen. McCain.

By Scott Creighton – American Everyman –

Grant Gerber: Horatius on Horseback

By William Grigg – Pro Libertate –

Then out spake brave Horatius, the Captain of the gate –
To every man upon this earth
Death cometh soon or late;
And how can man die better, than facing fearful odds,
For the ashes of his fathers, and the temples of his gods?

Grant Gerber, who died on October 24 in Elko, Nevada while surrounded by his family, was a casualty of war. The 72-year-old, who served as a military intelligence specialist with the Army Special Forces in Vietnam, did not succumb to an ancient injury suffered in combat with the Viet Cong. His wounds were inflicted in early October during a peaceful counter-offensive against an immeasurably more powerful collectivist enemy – the U.S. federal government.

In the fashion of many combat veterans, Gerber died as the result of a battlefield accident. He was an organizer of the “Grass March Cowboy Express,” a 2,800-mile horseback expedition intended to draw attention to the plight of western landowners, and to petition the government for relief. His fatal injuries occurred in Kansas when the horse he was riding stumbled in a prairie dog’s den and rolled on top of him.

Although Gerber’s death was not the result of a specific act of violence, it was nonetheless sustained in combat with an implacable enemy that – unlike the Viet Cong – is actually imposing communism on the home he held dear. Communism, as Marx’s Manifesto helpfully explained, is “the abolition of private property,” an objective toward which federal bureaucracies have made considerable progress.

In defiance of the U.S. Constitution and in harmony with the Communist Manifesto, the federal government is, by a considerable margin, the largest landowner in the United States. In each of the western states, Leviathan owns the majority of the available acreage. The Feds have possession of nearly ninety percent of the land in Nevada, which was obtained through an aggressive war with Mexico and steady expropriation of the Western Shoshone Indians. That pilfered property is administered by the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management, which are systematically strangling what remains of the ranching industry. Similar policies have devastated the mining and logging industries, in Nevada and throughout the region.

Gerber, a personal injury attorney who was elected to the Elko County Commission in 2012, clung tenaciously to the earnest but mistaken belief that the U.S. Constitution protects private property and restrains government power. He spent decades of his life fighting to restore the constitutional balance between the states and Washington. His model was colonial organizer and agitator Samuel Adams, who, like Gerber had been employed by the tax-extracting sector before repenting and lending his talents to the cause of individual liberty.

Prior to 1976, the federal Leviathan recognized – albeit grudgingly – the authority of county governments to manage “federal” lands. The successor to King George’s distant, tyrannical government decided to celebrate America’s Bicentennial by enacting the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (PLPMA), which ended the pretense of actual federalism by announcing perpetual ownership of those lands by Washington. That same measure turned the BLM into a fully realized police force – a fact memorably displayed earlier this year in the agency’s paramilitary assault on Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, his family, and their supporters.

Rather than submitting with expected docility to Washington’s land grab, western property owners – and, to their credit, many elected county officials – organized a revolt that came to be known as the “Sagebrush Rebellion.” Grant Gerber was among the first to enlist, and he quickly distinguished himself among his fellow rebels.

 
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