Edible park feeds 200,000 hungry people every month!

In Irvine, California, a 7.5 acre plot of land was turned into “The Incredible Edible Park”, a community garden which feeds 200,000 people each month. Every year, over 15,000 volunteers come through to help plant and harvest the food. The once unused plot of land was donated and is now run by an organization called the Second Harvest Food Bank.

According to their website:

“Through a network of 340 member charities distributing food at 480 locations Second Harvest alleviates food insecurity for more than 200,000 individuals in Orange County each month. Our member agencies are non-profit organizations such as shelters, churches, homes for battered and abused women and children and local pantries. As a vital link between the food industry and agencies that feed those at-risk of hunger, Second Harvest Food Bank has distributed more than 329 million pounds of food to the hungry in Orange County.”

The website also mentioned that a large portion of the food and resources are provided by local businesses and donors.

“More than 90 cents of every dollar donated goes directly to hunger-relief programs. The majority of our food is donated through restaurants, grocery stores, food manufacturers, growers and packers, our Incredible Edible Farm, Feeding America, the USDA, and corporate and individual food drives,” the website said.

“Through a network of 340 member charities distributing food at 480 locations Second Harvest alleviates food insecurity for more than 200,000 individuals in Orange County each month. Our member agencies are non-profit organizations such as shelters, churches, homes for battered and abused women and children and local pantries. As a vital link between the food industry and agencies that feed those at-risk of hunger, Second Harvest Food Bank has distributed more than 329 million pounds of food to the hungry in Orange County.”

By John Vibes – True Activist –

The Real Reason Wheat Is Toxic

There is clearly something going on with wheat that is not well known by the general public. It goes far and beyond organic versus nonorganic, gluten or hybridization because even conventional wheat triggers no symptoms for some who eat wheat in other parts of the world.

What indeed is going on with wheat?

For quite some time, I secretly harbored the notion that wheat in the United States must, in fact, be genetically modified. GMO wheat secretly invading the North American food supply seemed the only thing that made sense and could account for the varied experiences I was hearing about.

I reasoned that it couldn’t be the gluten or wheat hybridization. Gluten and wheat hybrids have been consumed for thousands of years. It just didn’t make sense that this could be the reason for so many people suddenly having problems with wheat and gluten in general in the past 5-10 years.

Finally, the answer came over dinner a couple of months ago with a friend who was well versed in the wheat production process. I started researching the issue for myself, and was, quite frankly, horrified at what I discovered.

The good news is that the reason wheat has become so toxic in the United States is not because it is secretly GMO as I had feared (thank goodness!).

The bad news is that the problem lies with the manner in which wheat is grown and harvested by conventional wheat farmers.

You’re going to want to sit down for this one. I’ve had some folks burst into tears in horror when I passed along this information before.

Common wheat harvest protocol in the United States is to drench the wheat fields with [Monsanto’s] Roundup several days before the combine harvesters work through the fields as the practice allows for an earlier, easier and bigger harvest.

By Sarah – The Healthy Home Economist –

Why You Should Celebrate Thanksgiving Like A Puritan

The Plymouth Separatists, Protestant Puritan believers we now call the Pilgrims, were theologically minded in a way difficult for many of us to grasp. “These were biblical theologians,” write theologians Joel R. Beeke and Mark Jones in their book A Puritan Theology: Doctrine for Life. They were “biblical in the sense that they quarried their theology from the Bible, but also biblical in the more modern sense of understanding and being concerned to expound the unified flow of the story of salvation and to see each element of it in its proper place in the story.”

The Puritans sought to honor the Lordship of Jesus Christ in every area of their lives and worked diligently to bring a Christian understanding of every facet of life, from labor in the fields to the study of Scripture. Writes Leland Ryken in Worldly Saints: The Puritans As They Really Were, “Puritanism was impelled by the insight that all of life is God’s. The Puritans lived simultaneously in two worlds—the invisible spiritual world and the physical world of earthly existence. For the Puritans, both worlds were equally real,and there was no cleavage of life into sacred and secular. All of life was sacred.”

Life lived in Christ was a joyous thing for the Puritans. It was not the gloomy, censorious toil that modern critics ascribe to it. As Ryken notes, George Fox, a leading early Quaker, criticized the Puritans for “their ribbons and lace and costly apparel” and their “sporting and feasting.” The Anglican/Evangelical theologian J.I. Packer writes that “the typical Puritans were not wild men, fierce and freaky, religious fanatics and social extremists, but sober, conscientious, and cultured citizens: persons of principle, devoted, determined, and disciplined, excelling in the domestic virtues.”

For example, the Puritans upheld the biblical teaching that sexual intimacy is reserved for one man and one woman within the covenant of marriage. But within that covenant, the marriage bed should be a place where sexual relations were pursued “with good will and delight, willingly, readily, and cheerfully,” according to Puritan pastor William Gouge.

The Separatists who met on that first Thanksgiving were not a doleful lot in solid black habits. They were a serious but joyous people, men and women who sought to serve their Lord in all things and at all times. They worked to recognize His presence and His sovereignty wherever they were; this gave them the comfort that comes from trusting in a loving Savior and the sense of obligation that comes from being not only His friends but His servants.

In a letter home to England in 1621, here’s how Plymouth Colony founder Edward Winslow described what happened on what we now call the first Thanksgiving:

… God be praised, we had a good increase of Indian corn, and our barley indifferent good, but our peas not worth the gathering, for we feared they were too late sown, they came up very well, and blossomed, but the sun parched them in the blossom; our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a more special manner rejoice together, after we had gathered the fruit of our labors; they four in one day killed as much fowl, as with a little help beside, served the company almost a week, at which time amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest King Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five deer, which they brought to the plantation and bestowed on our governor, and upon the captain, and others. And although it be not always so plentiful, as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want, that we often wish you partakers of our plenty.

These were a God-soaked people. The saw His blessing in times of abundance; they rested in His goodness in times of want. As we perform the 21st century equivalent of “discharging our arms” – watching football, playing silly games, snoring in our recliners – this coming Thursday, let’s rejoice not only in the astonishing blessings we presume upon every day but reflect on the true source of enduring joy, the God of the Puritans. And let’s be like them in our pursuit of Him. They, and He, would like that.

By Rob Schwarzwalder – Family Research Council –