Virginia House Votes 96-4 Against NDAA Indefinite Detention

RICHMOND (Feb. 10, 2015) – Today, the Virginia House of Delegates passed a bill to push back against federal indefinite detention powers. The vote was 96-4.

In 2013, Virginia was the first state to pass legislation in response to the indefinite detention powers purportedly authorized in the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) of 2012, still active today. That law was a first step, limited in scope, forbidding state agencies, in some situations, from cooperating with some federal attempts to exercise the indefinite detention provisions written into sections 1021 and 1022 of the National Defense Authorization Act.

For 2015, House Bill 2144 (HB2144), sponsored by Del. Benjamin L. Cline (R-Rockbridge), takes things two steps beyond simply refusing to cooperate with federal agents in the event of indefinite detention in Virginia. It sets the stage to create the type of leverage and attention D.C. would not want public if it refuses to cooperate with the state of Virginia.

This legislation would require two things from the feds if it wants to detains, pursuant to NDAA, any U.S. citizen in the state of Virginia.

One:

“the U.S.Secretary of Defense shall provide notification within 24 hours of the detention to both the Secretary of Public Safety and the chief law-enforcement officer of the locality in which the citizen is detained…

Two:

the U.S. Secretary of Defense or his designee shall seek authorization from the chief law-enforcement officer of the locality in which the citizen is detained prior to removal of the citizen from the locality”

A series of events is triggered upon failure to comply during such detainment of any person in the state of Virginia by the DoD. The state of Virginia will gather and publish Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs). These are essentially partnerships with state funds attached to them. These agreements are not necessarily legally binding, but usually offer some privacy between state, private enterprises (contractors), and federal agencies. Much of this kind of information usually remains hidden from the general public….

By Michael Boldin – Tenth Amendment Center –

Homework Teaches ‘Rights Are Special Privileges The Government Gives’

Apparently according to a homework sheet being given to our 2nd graders in this country about how to be good citizens, the government *gives* us our rights. Did you know that?

This is what eight-year-old kids are being taught in this country.

Wait, did I say taught? I meant being indoctrinated to blindly believe. They might as well exchange the word “citizen” in “being a good citizen” for “statist” or “fascist” or “communist.”

Not that it should even have to be said, but our rights are inalienable. Definition: unable to be taken away from or given away by the possessor. Why? Because they are inherent. Definition: existing in something as a permanent, essential, or characteristic attribute. The government is not in a position (although it is trying as hard as it’s tyrannical centralized little heart can) to grant or give rights which we already have. By the same token, those rights cannot be taken away by the government either.

You wouldn’t know it from this worksheet however. That’s the real message these kids are getting here. Because if the kids can be taught to believe the government gives them their rights, then would that same government not also be able to condition them that it can take their rights away as well?