Can Revolution Produce Freedom in the Technological Age of Surveillance and Control?

The topic of the Unabomber came up again. The favorite passage of transhumanist Ray Kurzweil and Bill Joy, founder of the now acquired Sun Microsystems in which Ted Kaczynski explains the “New Luddite Challenge” – essentially the question of what happens if computers take over, and if not, what happens at the hands of an elite who don’t need the masses for labor, or anything else. Will people be simply exterminated?

Will the population be gradually but sharply reduced through population control, eugenics, family planning and propaganda (as is actually happening now), or will the masses instead be treated as “pets” with cute hobbies and trivial pursuits, but no real meaning in society? The question remains, or could be a combination of all of the above.

In the face of mass unemployment and depopulation, is violent revolution justified? For reasons I explain, likely not. It is not clear who could be stopped with force that would result in stopping the tyranny; the tyranny exists, but it is systematic and compartmentalized in the hands of thousands, and probably millions of people. Moreover, violence has become a trivial event for media sensationalism and in justifying greater police state powers, etc. Thus, violence is the wrong approach on many levels, including moral.

Meanwhile, there is the question of liberty, and the kind of freedom that America’s Founding Fathers pursued circa 1776. Though other methods were attempting – the Tea Party protest, for instance – the revolution was ultimately fought through violent, guerrilla warfare. One of Thomas Jefferson’s most famous quotes – as author of the Declaration of Independence and third president of the United States of America – is: “The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.”

Years later, in his letters to John Adams, the second president and a former political enemy of Jefferson’s, Jefferson posed the idea that freedom could not so easily restored through violence, particularly if the public were unenlightened and uneducated in the ways of liberty and good self government.

Jefferson discusses the case of ancient Rome, where the usurped powers of Julius Caesar transformed the republic into a thoroughly corrupt dictatorship. Caesar was killed in a conspiracy by the Senate, led by Brutus. Ultimately, the Caesar family remained in control of the empire anyway.

But Jefferson argues that even if Brutus had prevailed, or other Roman freedom lovers such as Cicero or Cato in power, it would have been nearly impossible to create good government in the climate of corruption, and the era of debased, demoralized masses who were uneducated in the virtues of self-government….

By Aaron Dykes – Activist Post –

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Author: David McElroy

David Allen McElroy has served as a journalist and a chaplain to hospitals and nursing homes. He continues writing on the world-wide web and has much archived in the forum at BreakingAllTheRules.com. He has a B.A. in Bible from Fresno Pacific College. David stands for Truth, Justice, & Liberty in Christ's Love!