WHAT WOULD FREDERICK DOUGLAS THINK about Black History Month?

….February is recognized as Black History month. In my opinion, it is not securing the results the founders of a month dedicated to Black history had envisioned. I guess it’s biggest impact has been to encourage copycat special interest groups like homosexuals to dominate the month of June, for example. Ironically, the homosexuals plotted themselves within the month of June, which for a very long time was known as the month of weddings between men and women.

Personally I have always loved history. So, as a younger person when my interest in history was blossoming it was readily apparent that I developed a keen interest in how black Americans played a role in American history. I needed to know more than the tired tales of the woeful tragedy of slavery. However it was sometimes a little difficult finding the positive stories about Black American history that prior generations commonly learned about in school. I must credit my Dad for filling me in on numerous fantastic stories about numerous great American icons of history who just happened to be black and made positive impacts upon society. Whether through inventions, innovations, heroic battles in war, great inroads into the business world and even politics.

One of my favorite chapters of American history instructs us on the life and times of Frederick Douglas. He was born a slave in the year 1818. Seventy seven years later, he died of a massive heart attack at his home. During the decades between, Frederick Douglas lived as a sterling example of one who would not settle for the vision or even living standards others felt they had the right to impose upon him. Douglas’s voracious thirst for knowledge led him on an adventurous path that eventually exposed him to the authentic focuses of both Christianity and the United States Constitution.

It solidified his natural God given determination to live, be free and successful in this life. Frederick Douglas did not allow the racism of his era to be an excuse or a reason to live a bitter life of misery and lack. He believed he was great, not in a haughty sense, but in the recognition that he was created a human being meant for greatness, like everybody else. Thus his belief in God and himself helped propel him to become arguably the greatest orator of the nineteenth century….

By Ron Edwards – Clash Daily –

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Author: David McElroy

David Allen McElroy has served as a journalist and a chaplain to hospitals and nursing homes. He continues writing on the world-wide web and has much archived in the forum at BreakingAllTheRules.com. He has a B.A. in Bible from Fresno Pacific College. David stands for Truth, Justice, & Liberty in Christ's Love!